Posted by: Dec 31, 2019

CC Licensed: Boston Public Library

The 2020 Session of the Florida Legislature will include consideration of a number of bills affecting breweries, wineries, distilleries, and consumers.

The 2020 regular session of the Florida Legislature kicks off Tuesday, January 14, 2020. This 2-month session will see the consideration of a number of bills (though not as many as in prior years) that could affect the Florida beverage industry as soon as July.

For a refresher on how a bill goes from being introduced to becoming law in Florida, check out the Florida Senate’s Idea-to-Law Flowchart and the Florida League of City’s short video: Florida’s Legislative Process 101.

The following chart provides a summary of this session’s beverage-focused bills. We’ll check back in on the status of these bills at end of the session.

Bill #SponsorSimilar BillsSummaryStatus
HB 583SabatiniHB 6037
SB 138
SB 482
Repeals provisions relating to limitations on size of individual wine containers & individual cider containers; revises provisions that authorize restaurant to allow patrons to remove partially consumed bottles of wine from restaurant for off-premises consumption; revises requirements for sale of branded products by licensed craft distillery to consumers.12/11/2019: Favorable by Business and Professions Subcommittee; YEAS 8 NAYS 5; Now in Government Operations and Technology Appropriations Subcommittee
HB 6017SabatiniRepeals Florida’s Tied House Evil Statute, Florida Statutes Section 561.42.9/23/2019: Referred to Business and Professions Subcommittee; Government Operations and Technology Appropriations Subcommittee; Commerce Committee
HB 6037LaMarcaHB 583
SB 138
SB 482
Repeals Florida Statutes Section 564.05, which imposes limitation of size of individual wine containers.12/11/2019: Favorable by Business and Professions Subcommittee; YEAS 13 NAYS 0; Now in Commerce Committee
SB 138HutsonHB 583
HB 6037
SB 482
Repealing provisions relating to limitations on the size of individual wine containers and individual cider containers; revising provisions that authorize a restaurant to allow patrons to remove partially consumed bottles of wine from a restaurant for off-premises consumption; revising the requirements for the sale of branded products by a licensed craft distillery to consumers, etc.9/3/2019: Referred to Innovation, Industry, and Technology; Commerce and Tourism; Rules
SB 482BrandesHB 583
HB 6037
SB 138
Repealing provisions relating to limitations on the size of individual wine containers and individual cider containers; revising provisions that authorize a restaurant to allow patrons to remove partially consumed bottles of wine from the restaurant for off-premises consumption; revising the requirements for the sale of branded products by a licensed craft distillery to consumers; authorizing a craft distillery to transfer specified quantities of specified distilled spirits from certain locations to its souvenir gift shop, etc.11/1/2019: Referred to Innovation, Industry, and Technology; Commerce and Tourism; Rules

Do you have questions about how these proposed changes to Florida Beverage Law could affect our business or your plans for a new beverage business? Contact us at contact@brewerlong.com to schedule a 15-minute introductory call at no charge.

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